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Chemicals without HarmPolicies for a Sustainable World$
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Ken Geiser

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780262012522

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262012522.001.0001

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Developing Safer Alternatives

Developing Safer Alternatives

Chapter:
(p.271) 13 Developing Safer Alternatives
Source:
Chemicals without Harm
Author(s):

Ken Geiser

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262012522.003.0013

The successful shift away from chemicals of concern requires the development of new and safer alternatives. This involves the synthesis of new chemicals and chemical processes. Nanotechnology and synthetic biology both offer novel routes to such alternatives if they are effectively guided by a drive for safety and ecological compatibility. Green engineering and nonchemical alternatives also offer safer substitutes. These innovations require a clear definition of the term “safer” and tools for assisting in such searches. However, there is now a growing market of safer chemical and nonchemical alternatives that could use either government of private investment assistance to get to the scale and competitive prices that are needed for effective market conversions.

Keywords:   Chemical invention, chemical innovation, nanotechnology, synthetic biology, safer chemical definition, innovation diffusion, green chemistry sector

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