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Conceptual Analysis and Philosophical Naturalism$
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David Braddon-Mitchell and Robert Nola

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262012560

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262012560.001.0001

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A Partial Defense of Ramseyan Humility

A Partial Defense of Ramseyan Humility

Chapter:
(p.223) 10 A Partial Defense of Ramseyan Humility
Source:
Conceptual Analysis and Philosophical Naturalism
Author(s):

Dustin Locke

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262012560.003.0010

This chapter argues that we are irremediably ignorant about the identities of the fundamental properties that figure in the actual realization of the true final theory. Of the three published responses to Lewis’s work, each argues that even if Lewis’s metaphysical assumption, the thesis known as “quidditism,” is accepted, we need not accept his epistemic conclusion, the thesis of Humility. The aim of this chapter is to defend Lewis against these critics. Ann Whittle attempts to refute Humility by an appeal to a more lenient account of identification. Following is a defense of Lewis carried by showing that his taxing account of identification is a perfectly good account of at least one perfectly legitimate sense of identification.

Keywords:   fundamental properties, David Lewis, true final theory, Humility, Ann Whittle, identification

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