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The Ethics of ProtocellsMoral and Social Implications of Creating Life in the Laboratory$
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Mark A. Bedau and Emily C. Parke

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262012621

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262012621.001.0001

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New Technologies, Public Perceptions, and Ethics

New Technologies, Public Perceptions, and Ethics

Chapter:
(p.19) 2 New Technologies, Public Perceptions, and Ethics
Source:
The Ethics of Protocells
Author(s):

Brian Johnson

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262012621.003.0002

This chapter argues for the wisdom of proactive engagement with stakeholders. It examines the possible public attitudes toward new technologies for constructing protocells. This chapter shows that there are few, if any, codes of practice that apply to protocell research, and little development of regulation. It suggests that the ethical codes may develop to provide an ethical framework with defined boundaries for biological research. It also proposes that a European task force of researchers, ethicists, sociologists, representatives of civil society, and regulators be assembled and charged with developing a strategy for engaging with the public, the media, and the political community on the subject of self-replicating cellular technologies.

Keywords:   public attitudes, protocells, biological research, ethical codes, media, political community, cellular technologies

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