Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Communications Under the SeasThe Evolving Cable Network and Its Implications$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Bernard Finn and Daqing Yang

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262012867

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262012867.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use (for details see http://www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 24 November 2017

Submarine Cables and Diplomatic Culture

Submarine Cables and Diplomatic Culture

Chapter:
(p.209) 10 Submarine Cables and Diplomatic Culture
Source:
Communications Under the Seas
Author(s):

David Paull Nickles

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262012867.003.0102

This chapter talks about how submarine telegraphy has influenced and helped modify diplomatic relations to how it is today. In fact, there were those who saw the expansion of submarine telegraphy as an instrument for peace due to its potential to create mutual comprehension and respect. The chapter further explores the history of telegraphy with diplomatic culture and cites how some were suspicious of the benefits of the telegraph in diplomacy. Some believed the passage of time was their ally in the sense that when decisions and events were accelerated, they could result in dangerous outcomes. Ultimately, this exploration of the history of telegraphy provides a historical context for improving international relations. Henry Kissinger, in fact, expressed his concern for the state of diplomatic affairs in relation to telecommunications, and how we remain politically unprepared for its fruits.

Keywords:   submarine telegraphy, diplomatic relations, diplomatic culture, passage of time, international relations, Henry Kissinger

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.