Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Communications Under the SeasThe Evolving Cable Network and Its Implications$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Bernard Finn and Daqing Yang

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262012867

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262012867.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use (for details see http://www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 24 November 2017

Je t’aime, moi non plus: The Development of Atlantic Submarine Cables and the Complexity of the French-American Dialogue, 1870–1960

Je t’aime, moi non plus: The Development of Atlantic Submarine Cables and the Complexity of the French-American Dialogue, 1870–1960

Chapter:
(p.159) 8 Je t’aime, moi non plus: The Development of Atlantic Submarine Cables and the Complexity of the French-American Dialogue, 1870–1960
Source:
Communications Under the Seas
Author(s):

Pascal Griset

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262012867.003.0079

This chapter illustrates the operations and development of Atlantic submarine cables within the context of the French–American Dialogue. France and Great Britain are seen as important interlocutors for the United States to be able to garner a favorable relationship with Europe. Although there was cooperation between France and America, there were also strong tensions that much dialogue was needed, especially with the rise of US companies, and conflicting points of view began to show themselves. Censorship was one factor that created much conflict between America and France, and which greatly hampered the intercourse of American companies with Europe. This wartime censorship only cast doubt on the customers of cable companies, as their security and privacy was invaded. Even after the First World War, American cable companies came into conflict with European government administrations. The chapter shows the difficulties and relational problems between French and American interests in terms of telecommunications.

Keywords:   censorship, wartime censorship, Atlantic submarine cables, French–American Dialogue

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.