Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
WMD TerrorismScience and Policy Choices$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen M. Maurer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262012980

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262012980.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use (for details see http://www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 November 2017

Squeezing Value from Homeland Security Research: Designing Better R&D Incentives

Squeezing Value from Homeland Security Research: Designing Better R&D Incentives

Chapter:
(p.409) 15 Squeezing Value from Homeland Security Research: Designing Better R&D Incentives
Source:
WMD Terrorism
Author(s):

Stephen M. Maurer

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262012980.003.0015

Homeland security depends on the development of new technologies, yet the results from even well-funded programs have so far been disappointing. While this could theoretically be fixed by throwing more money at the problem, radically increased budgets are politically unlikely, which leaves better incentive design. This chapter presents a framework for addressing homeland security’s many R&D challenges. The chapter is organized as follows. Section 15.1 begins by describing the basic incentive mechanisms used to promote innovation and discusses their generic strengths and weaknesses. Section 15.2 focuses on multipart innovation, in which success requires successive steps along a development “pipeline” (e.g., drugs and vaccines) or simultaneous advances in several quasi-independent technologies (e.g., weapons systems). Section 15.3 uses this framework to analyze four grand-challenge R&D problems.

Keywords:   innovation incentives, homeland security, national security, research and development

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.