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Changing Climates in North American PoliticsInstitutions, Policymaking, and Multilevel Governance$
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Henrik Selin and Stacy D. VanDeveer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262012997

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262012997.001.0001

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Renewable Electricity Politics across Borders

Renewable Electricity Politics across Borders

Chapter:
(p.180) (p.181) 9 Renewable Electricity Politics across Borders
Source:
Changing Climates in North American Politics
Author(s):

Ian H. Rowlands

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262012997.003.0009

This chapter examines the current and possible cross-border issues between Canada and the United States with respect to the efforts to increase the use of renewable electricity. The greater use of renewable resources in electricity supply is necessary, in order to reduce the harmful impacts of climate change and to advance further sustainability for the countries that use them. The chapter briefly reviews the Canada–U.S. electricity exchanges and outlines the ways in which the two countries interact on concerns about electricity power. It also examines the issues that have already risen with respect to renewable electricity between the two countries, which place special emphasis on the electricity generated by large-scale hydropower facilities. The chapter then explores the additional concerns that may occur, such as issues associated with cross-border investment, green procurement, subsidies, and tradable certificates.

Keywords:   United States, Canada, renewable resources, climate change, electricity power

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