Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Isaac Newton on Mathematical Certainty and Method$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Niccolo Guicciardini

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262013178

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262013178.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use (for details see www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 September 2018

The Method of Series

The Method of Series

Chapter:
(p.138) (p.139) 7 The Method of Series
Source:
Isaac Newton on Mathematical Certainty and Method
Author(s):

Niccolò Guicciardini

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262013178.003.0007

This chapter explores the method of series developed in Newton’s De Analysi per aequationes numero terminorum infinitas. Newton’s method in the use of infinite series was heavily derived from the work of a fellow mathematician, John Wallis, most notably in Arithmetica Infinitorum. Wallis was a Savilian professor of geometry in Oxford University. His Arithmetica Infinitorum deals with the “quadrature of curvilinear figures,” which was an important topic in mathematics during the seventeenth century. Using a Wallisian interpolation technique, Newton came up with a mathematical discovery—the binomial series of fractional powers—which gave him access to the realm of infinite series as found in his work De Analysi.

Keywords:   Newton, John Wallis, De Analysi, Arithmetica Infinitorum, infinite series

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.