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Dynamic FacesInsights from Experiments and Computation$
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Cristobal Curio, Heinrich H. Bulthoff, and Martin A. Giese

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014533

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014533.001.0001

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Is Dynamic Face Perception Primary?

Is Dynamic Face Perception Primary?

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Is Dynamic Face Perception Primary?
Source:
Dynamic Faces
Author(s):

Alan Johnston

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014533.003.0002

In this chapter, the psychophysics of the human perception of dynamic faces is introduced along with a discussion of methodological and technical issues related to dynamic face perception that have significance for experimentalists and modelers working in this field. The problems encountered by experimentalists while explaining and understanding how human observers encode dynamic events, including temporal segmentation and temporal constancy, are also discussed. The chapter emphasizes that the information about facial gestures which are dynamic in nature is provided by facial motion. The role of natural sources of variation in the face that help to form the basis of the dimensions of face space in arriving at internal representations for faces is also discussed.

Keywords:   dynamic face perception, temporal segmentation, temporal constancy, facial motion, face space

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