Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Memory ProcessNeuroscientific and Humanistic Perspectives$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Suzanne Nalbantian, Paul M. Matthews, and James L. McClelland

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014571

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014571.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use (for details see http://www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 July 2018

Memory and Neurophilosophy

Memory and Neurophilosophy

Chapter:
(p.195) 9 Memory and Neurophilosophy
Source:
The Memory Process
Author(s):

John Bickle

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014571.003.0010

This chapter sheds light on some ways that neuroscientific research about learning and memory has been featured in landmark works in neurophilosophy. Neuroscientists have early on been cognizant of the fact that memory is a genuine cognitive function suitable for a variety of their investigative methods. The strong empirical focus demanded by neurophilosophy makes it no surprise that it is riddled with case studies drawn from the study of memory. Because of its suitability for neuroscientific investigation and explanation, memory lends itself to neurophilosophical reflections on, for example, the status of folk psychology, methodology in neuroscience, scientific reductionism, causal-mechanistic explanations, and multiple realization. The aim of this chapter is for these reflections to guide us toward a greater philosophical understanding of cognitive functions whose neural underpinnings are less obvious, such as perception, consciousness, decision-making, and normative judgment, to name a few that have garnered recent attention.

Keywords:   neuroscientific research, learning, memory, neurophilosophy, cognitive function, neural underpinnings, perception, consciousness, decision-making, normative judgment

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.