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WirelessnessRadical Empiricism in Network Cultures$
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Adrian Mackenzie

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014649

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014649.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
Wirelessness
Author(s):

Adrian Mackenzie

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014649.003.0001

This introductory chapter discusses the main themes covered in this book. It argues that the pleonasm wirelessness designates (1) a sensibility attuned to a proliferating ethos of gadgets, services, opportunities, and enterprises which transmit and receive information via radio waves using Internet-style network protocols; (2) a strong tendency to make network connections in many different places and times using such devices, products, and services; and (3) a heightened awareness of ongoing change and movement associated with networks, infrastructures, location, and information. Wirelessness in contemporary media and cities links directly to the core of William James’s argument concerning the flow of experience. An overview of the subsequent chapters is also presented.

Keywords:   wireless networks, wirelessness, Wi-Fi, William James

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