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Trading Zones and Interactional ExpertiseCreating New Kinds of Collaboration$
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Michael E. Gorman

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014724

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014724.001.0001

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Authenticity, Earth Systems Engineering and Management, and the Limits of Trading Zones in the Era of the Anthropogenic Earth

Authenticity, Earth Systems Engineering and Management, and the Limits of Trading Zones in the Era of the Anthropogenic Earth

Chapter:
(p.125) 7 Authenticity, Earth Systems Engineering and Management, and the Limits of Trading Zones in the Era of the Anthropogenic Earth
Source:
Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise
Author(s):

Brad Allenby

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014724.003.0007

The demographic, economic, cultural, and technological changes occurring since the Industrial Revolution have given rise to a new and challenging phenomenon: A planet dominated by the activity and culture of a single species. This anthropogenic earth is a challenge because it is characterized by integrated human/natural/built systems that are highly complex and rapidly changing, thus creating instability and radical contingency across physical, cultural, and psychological systems. This chapter focuses on the anthropogenic earth, arguing that what has traditionally been regarded as nature is part of a global sociotechnical system. It pays particular attention to the way in which ideology can prevent a trading zone—not everyone wants to trade—and criticizes the idea of the trading zone because it depends on “enlightenment and Western values.”

Keywords:   anthropogenic earth, sociotechnical system, ideology, trading zone, culture

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