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The Processing and Acquisition of Reference$
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Edward A. Gibson and Neal J. Pearlmutter

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262015127

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262015127.001.0001

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A Cross-Linguistic Study on the Interpretation of Pronouns by Children and Agrammatic Speakers: Evidence from Dutch, Spanish, and Italian

A Cross-Linguistic Study on the Interpretation of Pronouns by Children and Agrammatic Speakers: Evidence from Dutch, Spanish, and Italian

Chapter:
(p.133) 6 A Cross-Linguistic Study on the Interpretation of Pronouns by Children and Agrammatic Speakers: Evidence from Dutch, Spanish, and Italian
Source:
The Processing and Acquisition of Reference
Author(s):

Esther Ruigendijk

Sergio Baauw

Shalom Zuckerman

Nada Vasić

Joke de Lange

Sergey Avrutin

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262015127.003.0006

Both young children and agrammatic aphasic speakers have difficulty interpreting pronouns, but not reflexive elements. This phenomenon is known as the delay of Principle B effect in language acquisition. The interpretation of pronouns is non-adult-like for children and disturbed in agrammatic aphasia, yet there is evidence that interpretation of pronouns is not always problematic for these populations and that it seems to be governed by linguistic principles. This chapter examines the linguistic principles underlying the interpretation of pronouns and reflexives among children and agrammatic aphasic speakers whose native languages were Dutch, Spanish, and Italian by focusing on two types of sentences: simple transitive sentences and Exceptional Case Marking constructions. It first looks at earlier research on language acquisition and agrammatism before discussing two important linguistic theories, Government and Binding Theory and Reflexivity and Primitives of Binding.

Keywords:   children, agrammatic aphasia, pronouns, reflexives, language acquisition, simple transitive sentences, Exceptional Case Marking, Government and Binding Theory, Reflexivity, Primitives of Binding

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