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Trade and PovertyWhen the Third World Fell Behind$
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Jeffrey G. Williamson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262015158

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262015158.001.0001

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When the Third World Fell Behind

When the Third World Fell Behind

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 When the Third World Fell Behind
Source:
Trade and Poverty
Author(s):

Jeffrey G. Williamson

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262015158.003.0008

This chapter addresses the question of when the divergence between the west European leaders — a economic group often augmented by the United States — and the poor periphery emerged. It suggests that the nineteenth century looks like a period of exceptionally rapid divergence between core and periphery, and that divergence was most dramatic over the half century 1820 to 1870. It then considers the possible correlation between the world trade boom and accelerating divergence during the first global century up to 1913. This is followed by a brief discussion of the meaning of “open” economies. An overview of the subsequent chapters is also presented.

Keywords:   income gap, economic gap, European countries, nineteenth century, trade

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