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The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited$
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Brett Calcott and Kim Sterelny

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262015240

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262015240.001.0001

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How Many Levels Are There? How Insights from Evolutionary Transitions in Individuality Help Measure the Hierarchical Complexity of Life

How Many Levels Are There? How Insights from Evolutionary Transitions in Individuality Help Measure the Hierarchical Complexity of Life

Chapter:
(p.199) 10 How Many Levels Are There? How Insights from Evolutionary Transitions in Individuality Help Measure the Hierarchical Complexity of Life
Source:
The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited
Author(s):

Carl Simpson

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262015240.003.0011

This chapter argues that the multilevel selection (MLS)-1 to MLS-2 model of a major transition is incomplete because it overlooks a crucial component of fitness. It addresses that the evolution of individuality literature has failed to account for expansive fitness and that expansive fitness differences play an important role in the transition to regimes sensitive to the fitness of the corporate agent. It discusses multilevel evolution during the three phases of transitions in individuality: the aggregate phase, the group phase, and the individual phase. This chapter shows that the path a lineage takes through the phases of transitions is not fixed, but determined by ecology.

Keywords:   major transition, evolution, individuality, expansive fitness, aggregate phase, group phase, individual phase, multilevel selection

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