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The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited$
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Brett Calcott and Kim Sterelny

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262015240

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262015240.001.0001

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Darwinian Populations and Transitions in Individuality

Darwinian Populations and Transitions in Individuality

Chapter:
(p.65) 4 Darwinian Populations and Transitions in Individuality
Source:
The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited
Author(s):

Peter Godfrey-Smith

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262015240.003.0005

This chapter explores the evolution of levels of organization by making the idea of a Darwinian population central. It describes how marginal cases are important for understanding transitional cases. It suggests that thinking in terms of Darwinian populations provides a more fruitful approach than working with the concept of a replicator. It also highlights the paradigm, minimal and marginal cases, and the network of relations between populations. This chapter shows that the bottlenecks and germlines contribute to the Darwinization of the higher-level individuals and the partial de-Darwinizing of the lower.

Keywords:   Darwinian populations, bottlenecks, germlines, Darwinization, individuals

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