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ImpostersA Study of Pronominal Agreement$
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Chris Collins and Paul M. Postal

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780262016889

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262016889.001.0001

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Fake Indexicals

Fake Indexicals

Chapter:
(p.191) 15 Fake Indexicals
Source:
Imposters
Author(s):

Chris Collins

Paul M. Postal

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262016889.003.0015

Fake indexicals are those forms similar to non-third person pronominals but are interpreted as bound variables and not as referring to the speaker. Some examples fall under the concept of secondary sources. Of particular relevance is the specification that renders the subject of a predicate nominal a source for anything the predicate nominal is a source for. This chapter examines fake indexicals and Principle B, along with indexicality, imposters, and camouflage determiner phrases. It also considers partitives and fake-indexical readings and discusses an English form called number 1, which shares many properties with imposters. The chapter looks at VP-ellipsis before concluding with a discussion of the properties of number 1.

Keywords:   fake indexicals, pronominals, bound variables, Principle B, indexicality, imposters, determiner phrases, partitives, number 1, VP-ellipsis

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