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Human Information InteractionAn Ecological Approach to Information Behavior$
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Raya Fidel

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780262017008

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262017008.001.0001

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Information Need and the Decision Ladder

Information Need and the Decision Ladder

Chapter:
(p.83) 4 Information Need and the Decision Ladder
Source:
Human Information Interaction
Author(s):

Raya Fidel

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262017008.003.0004

Information need is a foundational concept related to both information seeking and human information interaction. Robert S. Taylor, a scholar of human information behavior, made significant contributions to research on information need. This chapter discusses the definitional and operational challenges associated with the study of information need. It also examines the decision ladder, a model of the decision making process introduced by Jens Rasmussen (1986) and his colleagues as part of a conceptual framework which they developed for cognitive work analysis. The decision ladder describes decision making as a process involving three phases: situation analysis, evaluation, and planning.

Keywords:   information need, information seeking, human information interaction, Robert S. Taylor, human information behavior, decision ladder, Jens Rasmussen, cognitive work analysis, situation analysis

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