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The Ethics of Animal ResearchExploring the Controversy$
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Jeremy R. Garrett

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780262017060

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262017060.001.0001

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Rational Engagement, Emotional Response, and the Prospects for Moral Progress in Animal Use “Debates”

Rational Engagement, Emotional Response, and the Prospects for Moral Progress in Animal Use “Debates”

Chapter:
(p.237) 14 Rational Engagement, Emotional Response, and the Prospects for Moral Progress in Animal Use “Debates”
Source:
The Ethics of Animal Research
Author(s):

Nathan Nobis

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262017060.003.0014

This chapter reveals that moral progress does not need any “new” philosophy or ethical theorizing. It determines three basic logical skills for rationally evaluating moral arguments. It reviews a cumulative, pluralistic case against animal research that draws on every major moral perspective that plausibly explains the moral relations among human beings. It also reports the moral issues regarding the treatment of animals, specifically in experimentation, research, product testing, and education. This chapter suggests that there is no moral justification for harmful animal experimentation. It provides some “logical-skill”-based recommendations for making moral progress, and acknowledges financial, social, and gustatory barriers to fair, impartial critical thinking about animal use.

Keywords:   moral progress, logical skills, animal research, animal experimentation, animal use, product testing, moral arguments

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