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The Ethics of Animal ResearchExploring the Controversy$
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Jeremy R. Garrett

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780262017060

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262017060.001.0001

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Empty Cages: Animal Rights and Vivisection

Empty Cages: Animal Rights and Vivisection

Chapter:
(p.107) 7 Empty Cages: Animal Rights and Vivisection
Source:
The Ethics of Animal Research
Author(s):

Tom Regan

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262017060.003.0007

This chapter outlines the basic argument linking animal rights with human rights and then critically responds to some of the more frequently encountered objections to animal rights. It discusses the overestimation of human benefits, the underestimation of human harms and comparisons across species. It suggests the claim that human benefits derived from vivisection greatly exceed the harms done to animals is more in the nature of unsupported ideology than demonstrated fact. It also argues that animal rights indicate that humans and other animals are equal in morally relevant respects. This chapter shows that the implications of animal rights for vivisection are both clear and uncompromising.

Keywords:   animal rights, human rights, human harms, human benefits, vivisection

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