Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cognitive SearchEvolution, Algorithms, and the Brain$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter M. Todd, Thomas T. Hills, and Trevor W. Robbins

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780262018098

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262018098.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use (for details see http://www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 16 December 2017

Unpacking Cognitive Search

Unpacking Cognitive Search

Mechanisms and Processes

Chapter:
(p.237) 15 Unpacking Cognitive Search
Source:
Cognitive Search
Author(s):

Thorsten Pachur

Jeroen G. W. Raaijmakers

Eddy J. Davelaar

Nathaniel D. Daw

Michael R. Dougherty

Bernhard Hommel

Michael D. Lee

Sean M. Polyn

K. Richard Ridderinkhof

Peter M. Todd

Jeremy M. Wolfe

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262018098.003.0015

This chapter discusses commonalities and differences in the cognitive mechanisms underlying different search tasks, such as spatial search, visual search, memory retrieval, action search, problem solving, and decision making. Three key issues relevant across all types of search are distinguished: (a) the initiation of search, (b) the maintenance and adaptive modification of the search process, and (c) the termination of search. As to search initiation, research is summarized concerning the effect of the number of cues on difficulty for executing search, and which factors structure the cue hierarchy. Discussion follows on how knowledge about metacognitive processes in memory might be used for better understanding the processes in maintenance of search, and heuristic principles for stopping search, possibly shared across different search tasks, are identified. Finally, consideration is given to how search processes might change as a function of experience and aging.

Keywords:   Strüngmann Forum Reports, cognitive search, action search, cue selection, decision making, memory retrieval, problem solving, search strategies, spatial search, visual search, metacognition

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.