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Moral Psychology, Volume 4Free Will and Moral Responsibility$
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Walter Sinnott-Armstrong

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262026680

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262026680.001.0001

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The Neural Code for Intentions in the Human Brain: Implications for Neurotechnology and Free Will

The Neural Code for Intentions in the Human Brain: Implications for Neurotechnology and Free Will

Chapter:
(p.157) 4 The Neural Code for Intentions in the Human Brain: Implications for Neurotechnology and Free Will
Source:
Moral Psychology, Volume 4
Author(s):

John-Dylan Haynes

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262026680.003.0005

Haynes summarizes his scientific research on the neural basis for intentions (including predictions of intentions) and suggests implications for epiphenomenalism, which implies that our mental intentions, choices, and will cannot really cause our bodily movements. In their comments, Bayne and Schroeder express doubts about whether Haynes's experiments really show as much as Haynes claims. Haynes replies by admitting some limitations but arguing further that the ability of neuroscientists to decode intentions and predict actions raises serious problems for traditional views of free will and moral responsibility.

Keywords:   Free will, Moral responsibility, Determinism, Bypassing, Epiphenomenalism, Intentions

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