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Rethinking Global Land Use in an Urban Era$
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Karen C. Seto and Anette Reenberg

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262026901

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262026901.001.0001

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Rethinking Global Land Use in an Urban Era

Rethinking Global Land Use in an Urban Era

An Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Rethinking Global Land Use in an Urban Era
Source:
Rethinking Global Land Use in an Urban Era
Author(s):

Karen C. Seto

Anette Reenberg

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262026901.003.0001

Land issues are central to geopolitics, economics, globalization, human well-being, and environmental sustainability. There is concern that not enough land will be available to meet societal and ecosystem needs of the projected global population by the middle of the 21st century. Three trends are currently reshaping land use locally and globally: urbanization, the integration of economies and markets, and the emergence of new land-use agents. The prevailing transition toward urban livelihoods results in changes in lifestyle, diet, and land use. Although distant societies have been connected for centuries through trade, the 21st century will be characterized by an acceleration of simultaneously occurring, global-reaching changes: increases in real-time information and communication, large-scale investments, massive rural to urban migration, climate change, and other environmental changes. This chapter discusses urban land teleconnections and proposes the need for conceptual framework to address the tension between the need to use land for societal benefits and the need to conserve land. Published in the Strungmann Forum Reports Series.

Keywords:   sustainable global land use, urbanization, teleconnections, sustainable land use, land ethics, globalization, food production, governance

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