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Imperial TechnoscienceTransnational Histories of MRI in the United States, Britain, and India$
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Amit Prasad

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262026956

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262026956.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Looking Back/Moving Forward

Chapter:
(p.115) Conclusion
Source:
Imperial Technoscience
Author(s):

Amit Prasad

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262026956.003.0007

“Nobel Prizes: Asian Scientists Set to Topple America's Run of Wins”: This 2011 Manchester Guardian's headline may seem premature, but it no longer sounds implausible. In fact, its discursive presence reflects a recent dramatic shift in the transnational geography of technoscience. Although this shift offers an opportunity to move beyond Euro/West-centric constructions, such a move requires a radical reorientation of our technoscientific imaginary. The conclusion highlights the role of two Eurocentric constructions that have played crucial roles in obscuring, if not erasing, the complex and vibrant genealogies of transnational technosciences. The first one conflates two different regimes of invention in Europe and the West and thereby presents a homogeneous and exclusive framing of the European/Western inventive spirit and, indeed, of European/Western exceptionalism as well. Transnational genealogies of technoscience have also been obscured because of Eurocentric framing of the Scientific Revolution. If we are able to move beyond such Eurocentric constructions, the conclusion argues, a very different picture will emerge of not only present-day transformations, but also of the much longer and influential genealogy of transnational technoscience.

Keywords:   Eurocentrism, western exceptionalism, regimes of invention, Scientific Revolution, genealogies of transnational technosciences

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