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Double DividendEnvironmental Taxes and Fiscal Reform in the United States$
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Dale W. Jorgenson, Richard J. Goettle, Mun S. Ho, and Peter J. Wilcoxen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262027090

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262027090.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.387) 10 Epilogue
Source:
Double Dividend
Author(s):

Dale W. Jorgenson

Richard J. Goettle

Mun S. Ho

Peter J. Wilcoxen

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262027090.003.0010

Market-based approaches to environmental policies, like energy taxes and tradable permits, are cost effective since all participants face the same prices for energy. These approaches can also generate substantial government revenues that can be used to reduce other taxes, improve economic performance, and enhance environmental quality. Market-based policies affect the economic decisions of millions of firms and households. These policies are evaluated in terms of their effects on individual and social welfare. The welfare indicators are accompanied by confidence intervals with associated probabilities that provide measures of uncertainty.

Keywords:   Market-based policies, Cost effective, Improved economic performance, Enhanced environmental quality, Individual welfare, Social welfare, Confidence intervals

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