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Engineers and the Making of the Francoist Regime$
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Lino Camprubí

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262027175

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262027175.001.0001

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The Total Systematization of a River and the Limitations of “Totalitarianism”: Industry, Agriculture, and Physical Models in the Pyrenees

The Total Systematization of a River and the Limitations of “Totalitarianism”: Industry, Agriculture, and Physical Models in the Pyrenees

Chapter:
(p.103) 5 The Total Systematization of a River and the Limitations of “Totalitarianism”: Industry, Agriculture, and Physical Models in the Pyrenees
Source:
Engineers and the Making of the Francoist Regime
Author(s):

Lino Camprubí

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262027175.003.0005

Between 1940 and 1967, some three hundred reservoirs were built in Spain both for agricultural and industrial purposes, thereby changing the appearance and economy of the country. Jumping from the opening of one reservoir to the next, Franco was soon baptized mockingly as Paco el Rana-Frankie the Frog.Nevertheless, dams were not the product of a personal obsession and political propaganda was probably not the main motivation. Behind each dam there were engineers who both designed it and planned its place within the new economy. Dams illustrate well the relationship of scientists and engineers to the autarkic political economy by revealing the existence of competing models for the autarkic state: import substitution and agricultural production.This chapter concentrates on the ‘total transformation’ of the Noguera Ribagorzana river from 1946 to 1961. It explores the meanings and limitations of ‘totalitarianism’ as an actor's category, as well as the competition for water needed for industries and irrigation. It also looks at physical scale models as (sometimes failed) mediators between laboratories and landscapes.

Keywords:   Water reservoirs, Dams, Noguera Ribagorzana, Rivers, Agriculture, Industry, Scale models, Hydropower

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