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Transparency in Global Environmental GovernanceCritical Perspectives$
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Aarti Gupta and Michael Mason

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262027410

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262027410.001.0001

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Global Pesticide Governance by Disclosure: Prior Informed Consent and the Rotterdam Convention

Global Pesticide Governance by Disclosure: Prior Informed Consent and the Rotterdam Convention

Chapter:
(p.107) 5 Global Pesticide Governance by Disclosure: Prior Informed Consent and the Rotterdam Convention
Source:
Transparency in Global Environmental Governance
Author(s):

Jansen Kees

Dubois Milou

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262027410.003.0005

In this chapter, Kees Jansen and Milou Dubois analyze the historical evolution, institutionalization, and effects of information disclosure in global pesticide governance. Through analysis of the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade, Jansen and Dubois consider the extent to which information disclosure has helped to empower developing countries to make informed choices about imports of risky chemicals. They show that disclosure does have certain empowering effects, if empowerment is understood narrowly as enhanced capacities to take decisions. They also argue that the substantive impact of the Rotterdam Convention, in mitigating environmental and human health harm, is limited by the fact that very few chemicals are currently subject to its PIC procedure, a result of the geopolitical and material contexts within which such decisions are made. This conclusion notwithstanding, the authors are cautiously optimistic about the prospects for transparency to contribute in the long run to improved global pesticide governance.

Keywords:   Rotterdam Convention, transparency, prior informed consent, empowerment

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