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Transparency in Global Environmental GovernanceCritical Perspectives$
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Aarti Gupta and Michael Mason

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262027410

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262027410.001.0001

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Risk Governance through Transparency: Information Disclosure and the Global Trade in Transgenic Crops

Risk Governance through Transparency: Information Disclosure and the Global Trade in Transgenic Crops

Chapter:
(p.133) 6 Risk Governance through Transparency: Information Disclosure and the Global Trade in Transgenic Crops
Source:
Transparency in Global Environmental Governance
Author(s):

Gupta Aarti

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262027410.003.0006

In this chapter, Aarti Gupta analyses the extent to which information disclosure facilitates safe global trade and use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), as mandated within the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety negotiated under the Convention on Biological Diversity. The chapter analyses whether the scope and practices of disclosure relating to GMOs in agricultural trade further a right to know and choose of importing (developing) countries, in permitting or restricting such trade.Through analysing the limited disclosure obligations imposed on GMO exporting (industrialized) countries by the protocol, the chapter argues that disclosure follows rather than shapes market developments, since no existing practices have to change. Furthermore, a complex detection and testing infrastructure is required to put the limited disclosed information to use. As such, themarket-facilitating norm of caveat emptor(let the buyer beware) prevails in practice. Transparency thus fails to empower the poorest countries most reliant on globally induced disclosure in this case.

Keywords:   Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, transparency, information disclosure, Genetically modified organisms

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