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Beyond Imported MagicEssays on Science, Technology, and Society in Latin America$
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Eden Medina, Ivan da Costa Marques, and Christina Holmes

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262027458

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262027458.001.0001

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Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: How an Emerging Area on the Scientific Agenda of the Core Countries Has Been Adopted and Transformed in Latin America

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: How an Emerging Area on the Scientific Agenda of the Core Countries Has Been Adopted and Transformed in Latin America

Chapter:
(p.225) 11 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: How an Emerging Area on the Scientific Agenda of the Core Countries Has Been Adopted and Transformed in Latin America
Source:
Beyond Imported Magic
Author(s):

Noela Invernizzi

Matthieu Hubert

Dominique Vinck

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262027458.003.0011

Invernizzi, Hubert, and Vinck study the development of nanoscience policy in Brazil, Mexico, and Argentina to examine how the scientific priorities of nations outside Latin America shape those in Latin America. Acknowledging the strong policy influence of the United States and Europe, they nonetheless challenge the narrative of policy imitation by showing how the distinctive character of national and international scientific networks in different Latin American countries, and the scientific traditions within each country, shape the specific character of these policies despite their common rhetoric. They thus argue that local factors contribute to the ways in which scientific development is materially organized and scientific policies travel and change.

Keywords:   Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, policy, scientific development, scientific networks, technological imitation, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina

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