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Beyond Imported MagicEssays on Science, Technology, and Society in Latin America$
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Eden Medina, Ivan da Costa Marques, and Christina Holmes

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780262027458

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262027458.001.0001

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Bottling Atomic Energy: Technology, Politics, and the State in Peronist Argentina

Bottling Atomic Energy: Technology, Politics, and the State in Peronist Argentina

Chapter:
(p.267) 13 Bottling Atomic Energy: Technology, Politics, and the State in Peronist Argentina
Source:
Beyond Imported Magic
Author(s):

Jonathan Hagood

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262027458.003.0013

Hagood uses the history of nuclear energy in Argentina to challenge overly simple and often decontextualized understandings of technological success and failure in Latin American contexts. Examining how the political world of 1940s-50s Argentina made it possible for Argentine president Juan Péron and the German émigré scientist Ronald Richter to envision creating a “bottle of atomic energy,” Hagood argues that although these efforts are often viewed as a failure (or an example of a savvy scientist duping a president), the project helped Perón achieve his short-term political goals and thus can be seen as a political, if not technological, success.

Keywords:   Nuclear, atomic energy, nuclear history, Juan Péron, Ronald Richter, Argentina

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