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Complexity and EvolutionToward a New Synthesis for Economics$
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David S Wilson and Alan Kirman

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035385

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035385.001.0001

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A Typology of Human Morality

A Typology of Human Morality

Chapter:
(p.97) 7 A Typology of Human Morality
Source:
Complexity and Evolution
Author(s):

Herbert Gintis

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035385.003.0007

This chapter suggests a typology of human morality based on gene–culture coevolution, the rational actor model, and behavioral game theory. The basic principles are that human morality is the product of an evolutionary dynamic in which evolving culture makes new behaviors fitness enhancing, thus altering our genetic constitution. It is thus predicated upon an evolved set of human genetic predispositions and consists of the capacity to conceptualize and value a moral realm governing behavior beyond consequentialist reasoning.

Keywords:   Strüngmann Forum Reports, behavioral game theory, evolution of morality, fitness, gene–culture coevolution, morality, rationality, paradox of voting

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