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Invisible MindFlexible Social Cognition and Dehumanization$
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Lasana T. Harris

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262035965

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262035965.001.0001

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The Delayed Sudden Death Virus Outbreak

The Delayed Sudden Death Virus Outbreak

Chapter:
(p.101) 6 The Delayed Sudden Death Virus Outbreak
Source:
Invisible Mind
Author(s):

Lasana T. Harris

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262035965.003.0006

The six chapter presents a thought experiment that examines why flexible social cognition may have been evolutionarily preserved. It introduces the human capacity for deception as a possible situational factor that promoted flexible social cognition related to human migratory patterns during the ancestral past. It examines the interplay between the self and social groups, before revisiting the thought experiment set in modern society instead of human’s ancestral past. It then explores deception, intention, and complex mental life as situational factors that would affect the outcome of the thought experiment in this modern context.

Keywords:   Death by ideas, Human migration, Social evolution, Deception, Intention, Complex mental life, Self, Social groups, Social networks

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