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Is the Universe a Hologram?Scientists Answer the Most Provocative Questions$
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Adolfo Plasencia

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262036016

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262036016.001.0001

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Encryption as a Human Right

Encryption as a Human Right

Chapter:
(p.223) 20 Encryption as a Human Right
Source:
Is the Universe a Hologram?
Author(s):

David Casacuberta

Adolfo Plasencia

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262036016.003.0020

In this dialogue, the philosopher David Casacuberta starts out by reflecting on how, with the advent of digital technologies, people’s rights are threatened by new problems that require new solutions. He goes on to argue why rights cannot be reduced in the age of technology and Internet. He defends the reasons why access to the Internet should be totally anonymous and argues that cryptography could be a core element for achieving this. He then explains his idea about “privacy as dignity”, and why privacy needs to be redefined. Next, he talks about why we must oppose surveillance from a cultural point of view, - and that doing so is a matter of respect and dignity -, as well as why the right to encrypt is an individual right. Casacuberta finishes by explaining why at present we are culturally faced with the dilemma of collective security, and what consequences this will have for us.

Keywords:   Encryption, The transparent society, Copyright violation, Surveillance, Net neutrality, Digital privacy, Privacy as dignity, Mass electronic surveillance, The Right to Encrypt, Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)

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