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Green GradesCan Information Save the Earth?$
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Graham Bullock

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262036429

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262036429.001.0001

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Valuing Green: The Content of the Information

Valuing Green: The Content of the Information

Chapter:
(p.27) 2 Valuing Green: The Content of the Information
Source:
Green Grades
Author(s):

Graham Bullock

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262036429.003.0002

Chapter 2 introduces and explores questions about the content of information-based strategies with a motivating example focused on food choices. What values are embedded in programs that evaluate food products and companies, such as USDA Organic, Food Alliance, and Fair Trade? Different conceptions of value and values, are used to analyze the content of these and other similar initiatives. These concepts help reveal the many factors that determine whether different audiences will respond to environmental certifications and ratings, from the nature of the information provided to the personal preferences of individuals and their exposure to different forms of marketing and education. The chapter asserts that values are essential to understanding the perceived relevance of different forms of information content, and presents a range of data and theories about the relationships between values and different product categories, geographic scales, types of goods, and parts of the value chain. It concludes with a discussion of the most promising and problematic practices for increasing the perceived relevance and importance of the content of information-based strategies.

Keywords:   Values, Value, Food, Organic, Public, Private, Health, Consumers

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