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Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social JusticeFrom Loncheras to Lobsta Love$
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Julian Agyeman, Caitlin Matthews, and Hannah Sobel

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262036573

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262036573.001.0001

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Reflexive Food Truck Justice: A Case Study in CLiCK, Inc., a Nonprofit, Shared-Use Commercial Kitchen

Reflexive Food Truck Justice: A Case Study in CLiCK, Inc., a Nonprofit, Shared-Use Commercial Kitchen

Chapter:
(p.149) 8 Reflexive Food Truck Justice: A Case Study in CLiCK, Inc., a Nonprofit, Shared-Use Commercial Kitchen
Source:
Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social Justice
Author(s):

Phoebe Godfrey

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262036573.003.0008

This chapter critically applies the concept of reflexive food justice to the creation and running of a non-profit shared-use commercial kitchen, CLiCK, Inc., in Eastern Connecticut in order to critically evaluate to what degree it does or does not meet the criteria of reflexive food justice. The purpose of such an analysis is to question the ways in which shared use kitchens can act as agents of progressive social change in relation to facilitating low-income community members to have access of a commercial kitchen so that they may incubate a food business, which may or may not involve a food tuck or food cart. In many states food trucks and food carts need to be affiliated with a brick and mortar kitchen and so CLiCK makes such an affiliation affordable to those who might not be able to otherwise start a food business. Since the chapter is written by CLICK’s co-founder and Board President this critical analysis provides intimate details as to the struggles in not just running a non-profit shared use commercial kitchen, but in doing so in ways that seek to promote progressive social change, both within the organization itself and the surrounding community.

Keywords:   Reflexive food justice, shared-use commercial kitchen, the commons, food business incubator, non-profit, progressive social change, food trucks, food carts

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