Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social JusticeFrom Loncheras to Lobsta Love$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Julian Agyeman, Caitlin Matthews, and Hannah Sobel

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780262036573

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262036573.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use (for details see www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 September 2018

Scripting the City: Street Food, Urban Policy, and Neoliberal Redevelopment in Vancouver, Canada

Scripting the City: Street Food, Urban Policy, and Neoliberal Redevelopment in Vancouver, Canada

Chapter:
(p.243) 13 Scripting the City: Street Food, Urban Policy, and Neoliberal Redevelopment in Vancouver, Canada
Source:
Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social Justice
Author(s):

Lenore Lauri Newman

Katherine Alexandra Newman

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262036573.003.0013

The reintroduction of food trucks to Vancouver responds to widespread public demand, yet has also been taken up as another tool of urban governance. Licensing restrictions are used to further municipal policy priorities, thus incorporating street food into city branding and urban redevelopment strategies. Although crafted to foster liveability, food truck licensing is also expected to advance the goal of making Vancouver the Greenest City and to project an image of a healthy, sustainable, multicultural city. While street food is being made increasingly accessible, it is simultaneously becoming a tool of biopolitical regulation. As food trucks participate in shaping urban space, they risk contributing to gentrification and the displacement of the very residents this increased accessibility is meant to serve.

Keywords:   food trucks, urban policy, city branding, multiculturalism, gentrification, neoliberal urbanism

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.