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Weather by the NumbersThe Genesis of Modern Meteorology$
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Kristine C. Harper

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262083782

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262083782.001.0001

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:: Toward a More Dynamic Atmosphere: Discipline Development in the Interwar Period (1919–1938)

:: Toward a More Dynamic Atmosphere: Discipline Development in the Interwar Period (1919–1938)

Chapter:
(p.49) 2 :: Toward a More Dynamic Atmosphere: Discipline Development in the Interwar Period (1919–1938)
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Weather by the Numbers
Author(s):

Kristine C. Harper

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262083782.003.0003

This chapter discusses the establishment of meteorology programs, and later departments, beginning in the late 1920s. Carl-Gustav Rossby’s theoretical program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was followed within a few years by applied aviation-related meteorology programs at New York University and at the California Institute of Technology. Young people interested in meteorology—not to mention forecasters already employed by the US Weather Bureau, the US Navy, and the US Army Signal Corps—had domestic options for meteorological education. Having formed their own national professional organization in 1919—the American Meteorological Society (AMS)—a higher-profile meteorology community took shape. The AMS encouraged the expansion of educational opportunities at all levels and worked to influence an emerging research agenda in meteorology.

Keywords:   meteorology programs, academic programs, weather forecasting, American Meteorological Society

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