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Bioethics in the Age of New Media$
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Joanna Zylinska

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262240567

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262240567.001.0001

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Green Bunnies and Speaking Ears: The Ethics of Bioart

Green Bunnies and Speaking Ears: The Ethics of Bioart

Chapter:
(p.149) 6 Green Bunnies and Speaking Ears: The Ethics of Bioart
Source:
Bioethics in the Age of New Media
Author(s):

Joanna Zylinska

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262240567.003.0006

This chapter talks about bioart, which means art that uses biological material such as human tissue, blood, or genes. This form of art has evoked lot of criticism from the artist fraternity. Such practices have led to a widespread panic of the creation of a “Frankenstein world.” The chapter discusses Eduardo Kac’s (an American contemporary artist) Green Fluorescent Bunny project, included the creation of a transgenic albino rabbit created in a French science lab. A gene that is similar to the fluorescent green gene in jellyfish was introduced into the rabbit so that the rabbit was supposed to glow with a greenish ultra-violet light. Stelarc, a Cypriot-Australian performance artist, created an Extra Ear that is worn on the arm and acts as a wireless transmitter of sounds.

Keywords:   transgenic albino rabbit, Extra Ear, arm, bioart, performance artist

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