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The Crucible of ConsciousnessAn Integrated Theory of Mind and Brain$
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Zoltan Torey

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780262512848

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262512848.001.0001

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The Evolution of Language

The Evolution of Language

Chapter:
(p.52) (p.53) 3 The Evolution of Language
Source:
The Crucible of Consciousness
Author(s):

Zoltan Torey

Daniel C. Dennett

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262512848.003.0004

This chapter focuses on the arguably obscure antecedents of language, together with the anatomical changes that helped in the evolution of language. It is the goal of this chapter to show that language has evolved in, at least, two discernible stages and that it possesses a layered structure. These developmental studies are vital in the study of language; ignoring them would lead to a dead end in the explanation of how language was acquired. Intracortical conditions, which generated the word, stabilized the percept, and made their linkage possible, are also examined. The anatomical changes in the larynx are also discussed to determine whether the role of such a change was decisive. The evolution of the larynx definitely facilitated the process of articulation but was not responsible for the evolution of language as such.

Keywords:   antecedents of language, evolution of language, intracortical conditions, anatomical changes, larynx, articulation

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