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Entangled GeographiesEmpire and Technopolitics in the Global Cold War$
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Gabrielle Hecht

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262515788

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262515788.001.0001

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A Plundering Tiger with Its Deadly Cubs? The USSR and China as Weapons in the Engineering of a “Zimbabwean Nation,” 1945–2009

A Plundering Tiger with Its Deadly Cubs? The USSR and China as Weapons in the Engineering of a “Zimbabwean Nation,” 1945–2009

Chapter:
(p.231) 10 A Plundering Tiger with Its Deadly Cubs? The USSR and China as Weapons in the Engineering of a “Zimbabwean Nation,” 1945–2009
Source:
Entangled Geographies
Author(s):

Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262515788.003.0010

This chapter deals with the rivalry between the USSR and China, and their exploitation of the third world countries in that context. It is believed that without the Cold War, Asia, Africa, and Latin America would have been different nations. In 1976, Zambian president Kenneth Kaunda spoke of the Soviet presence in South Africa as “a plundering tiger with its deadly cubs coming through the back door.” The Soviets and Chinese, on one hand, and the Zimbabwe African People’s Union (ZAPU) and the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU), on the other, transformed one another into weapons by teaching guerilla warfare. The chapter recounts the events that led the leaders of Zimbabwe to use China and Soviet Union for weaponry, and how the Soviets and the Chinese created African guerillas by recruiting civilians under false pretense.

Keywords:   USSR, China, South Africa, Kenneth Kaunda, ZAPU, ZANU, African guerillas

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