Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Consciousness RevisitedMaterialism without Phenomenal Concepts$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Tye

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780262012737

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262012737.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 04 March 2021

Change Blindness and the Refrigerator Light Illusion

Change Blindness and the Refrigerator Light Illusion

Chapter:
(p.155) 7 Change Blindness and the Refrigerator Light Illusion
Source:
Consciousness Revisited
Author(s):

Michael Tye

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262012737.003.0008

This chapter focuses on a phenomenon known as change blindness, wherein major changes can be made in pictures without the viewer being conscious of them. Various hypotheses have been put forward on the basis of the change-blindness experiments. The most important of these are the arguments contending that we do not see all the changes; another one stating that, although we are under the impression that we see everything in the visual field, this is, in fact, an illusion; and another one that states that our visual experience is much sparser than is commonly supposed. In this chapter, it is argued that a significant part of the initial claims made by change-blindness theorists is correct or at least very plausible.

Keywords:   change blindness, change-blindness experiments, illusion, visual experience, change-blindness theorists

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.