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Color Ontology and Color Science$
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Jonathan Cohen and Mohan Matthen

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262013857

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262013857.001.0001

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How Do Things Look to the Color-Blind?

How Do Things Look to the Color-Blind?

Chapter:
(p.258) (p.259) 11 How Do Things Look to the Color-Blind?
Source:
Color Ontology and Color Science
Author(s):

Alex Byrne

David R. Hilbert

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262013857.003.0012

This chapter addresses the question as is posed in the title. In other words, the question being asked concerns the colors represented by a dichromat’s experience. Color-vision defects constitute a spectrum of disorders with varying degrees and types of departure from normal human color vision. One form of color-vision defect is dichromacy; by mixing together only two lights, the dichromat can match any light, unlike normal trichromatic humans, who need to mix three. In a philosophical context, the question may be taken in two ways. First, it can be taken at face value as a question about visible properties of external objects, and second, it may be interpreted as the more intangible question of “what it’s like” to be color-blind.

Keywords:   colors, dichromat, color-vision defects, human color vision, dichromacy, trichromatic, visible properties, external objects, color-blind

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