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Color Ontology and Color Science$
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Jonathan Cohen and Mohan Matthen

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262013857

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262013857.001.0001

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More than Three Dimensions: What Continuity Considerations Can Tell Us about Perceived Color

More than Three Dimensions: What Continuity Considerations Can Tell Us about Perceived Color

Chapter:
(p.91) 4 More than Three Dimensions: What Continuity Considerations Can Tell Us about Perceived Color
Source:
Color Ontology and Color Science
Author(s):

Reinhard Niederée

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262013857.003.0005

This chapter presents a fundamental challenge to widely held mainstream assumptions regarding the three-dimensionality of color space in normal human color vision. The Janus-facedness of the concept of color must be acknowledged at the onset before we can refer to a space of colors, i.e. it should be understood as referring to some property of real objects “out there” (external aspect), or to the color appearances evoked by such objects in a human perceiver, that is, to perceived color or phenomenal color (internal aspect). It is demonstrated here that these two aspects, in fact, complement each other even if both their conceptual states are the topic of controversy. This chapter does not, in any way, address issues pertaining to the external aspect, so corresponding philosophical controversies such as that between color realists and antirealists is not discussed here.

Keywords:   three-dimensionality, color space, human color vision, Janus-facedness, external aspect, internal aspect, phenomenal color, color realists, antirealists

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