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Color Ontology and Color Science$
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Jonathan Cohen and Mohan Matthen

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262013857

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262013857.001.0001

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Where in the World Color Survey Is the Support for Color Categorization Based on the Hering Primaries?

Where in the World Color Survey Is the Support for Color Categorization Based on the Hering Primaries?

Chapter:
(p.179) 7 Where in the World Color Survey Is the Support for Color Categorization Based on the Hering Primaries?
Source:
Color Ontology and Color Science
Author(s):

Kimberly A. Jameson

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262013857.003.0008

This chapter focuses on a factor widely considered by the standard view to be the basis for color-naming phenomena and explores some plausible, comparatively uninvestigated factors that might underlie color naming. These are illustrated, in part, through a reexamination of World Color Survey (WCS) data as it has been presented by Kuehni. The aim of this chapter is to examine the appropriateness of the Hering opponent-color construct as a theoretical foundation for explaining patterns of color naming in datasets like the WCS, which include many languages that do not use Hering color terms. The main conclusion reached is that a proper explanation for cross-cultural color naming and categorization should not depend on the Hering opponent-color construct.

Keywords:   the standard view, color-naming phenomena, World Color Survey, WCS, Kuehni, Hering opponent-color construct, cross-cultural color naming

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