Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Cognitive Neuroscience of MindA Tribute to Michael S. Gazzaniga$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Patricia A. Reuter-Lorenz, Kathleen Baynes, George R. Mangun, and Elizabeth A. Phelps

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014014

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014014.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 13 October 2019

The Contribution of Malleability to Collective Memory

The Contribution of Malleability to Collective Memory

Chapter:
(p.139) 10 The Contribution of Malleability to Collective Memory
Source:
The Cognitive Neuroscience of Mind
Author(s):

William Hirst

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014014.003.0100

Collective memory, which is shared across a community, helps construct a collective identity and contributes to the development of strong social bonds. This is similar to autobiographical memory, which helps shape personal identity. This chapter discusses how a memory is shared across a community. The malleability of memory plays a role in constructing shared memories, which contributes to collective identity and helps create social bonds. The chapter further explores whether distinct memories of shared experiences can be changed into shared memories through social interactions. Conversations about the past are thought of as the most frequently occurring social interactions, which allow dissimilar memories to become shared as soon as people start talking. When more shared memories emerge, collective memories get deeper and social bonds increase.

Keywords:   collective memory, memories, malleability, conversations, shared experiences, personal identity

MIT Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.