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Work Meets LifeExploring the Integrative Study of Work in Living Systems$
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Robert Levin, Simon Laughlin, Christina De La Rocha, and Alan Blackwell

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014120

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014120.001.0001

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Do Energy Allocations Affect Work Performance? The Working Energy/Take-Home Energy Trade-off Hypothesis

Do Energy Allocations Affect Work Performance? The Working Energy/Take-Home Energy Trade-off Hypothesis

Chapter:
(p.165) 8 Do Energy Allocations Affect Work Performance? The Working Energy/Take-Home Energy Trade-off Hypothesis
Source:
Work Meets Life
Author(s):

Robert Levin

Kevin Laland

Stacy Saturay

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014120.003.0008

This chapter introduces the working energy/take-home energy trade-off hypothesis. The possible links between energetic trade-offs and modern human behavior related to the workplace are examined. This chapter also shows the existence of effective physiological mechanisms for detecting and responding to trade-offs in working and take-home energy in humans. It suggests that the working energy/take-home energy trade-off hypothesis indicates more broadly that satisfaction-performance trade-offs may be the norm within relatively stable employment relationships. Moreover, the working energy/take-home energy trade-offs mediate between the physiological and the psychological, affecting energetics, behavior, and work in ways both nuanced and fundamental.

Keywords:   working energy, take-home energy, trade-offs, human behavior, work, energetic

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