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The Two Halves of the BrainInformation Processing in the Cerebral Hemispheres$
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Kenneth Hugdahl and Rene Westerhausen

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014137

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014137.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 29 June 2022

The Origins of Psychosis and the Evolution of Language: Cerebral Asymmetry Sex Chromosomes, and speciation

The Origins of Psychosis and the Evolution of Language: Cerebral Asymmetry Sex Chromosomes, and speciation

Chapter:
(p.621) 21 The Origins of Psychosis and the Evolution of Language: Cerebral Asymmetry Sex Chromosomes, and speciation
Source:
The Two Halves of the Brain
Author(s):

Timothy J. Crow

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014137.003.0458

This chapter reviews the case that cerebral asymmetry (the torque) is necessary to an understanding of psychosis, and argues that it can be understood only in terms of the origins of humans and the evolution of language. It shows that there are systematic changes in the paracingulate and cingulate regions which are sex dependant, may progress in relation to disease, and in some instances are asymmetrical. The chapter reveals that the nature and form of psychosis’s symptoms describe the brain mechanisms specific to Homo sapiens. It also suggests that sexual selection and speciation are related in a way that is consistent with Charles Darwin’s intuition, and which perhaps addresses the concerns of Thomas Huxley.

Keywords:   cerebral asymmetry, torque, psychosis, humans, evolution of language, brain, Homo sapiens, sexual selection, speciation

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