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Agreement and Head MovementClitics, Incorporation, and Defective Goals$
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Ian Roberts

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014304

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014304.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Agreement and Head Movement
Author(s):

Ian Roberts

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014304.003.0001

This book explores the consequences of Noam Chomsky’s theory that head movement is not part of narrow syntax and argues that the current notion of syntax can and must accommodate a species of head movement. More specifically, it suggests that head movement is part of the narrow syntax, and that it applies where the goal of an Agree relation is defective. The book also implies a notion of structural deficiency as the key to understanding the conditions under which internal merge may apply to terminals, and proposes that head movement applies where the goal of an Agree relation is defective. Moreover, it shows that head movement does not differ considerably in its LF-effects from DP-movement (A-movement), considers three possible ways of eliminating head movement from narrow syntax (structure preservation, chain uniformity, and the A-over-A Condition), and describes the movement of simultaneously minimal and maximal categories, focusing on Romance clitics.

Keywords:   Noam Chomsky, head movement, narrow syntax, LF-effects, DP-movement, A-over-A Condition, clitics, structure preservation, chain uniformity, Agree relation

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