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The Memory ProcessNeuroscientific and Humanistic Perspectives$
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Suzanne Nalbantian, Paul M. Matthews, and James L. McClelland

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014571

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014571.001.0001

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The Epigenetic Variability of Memory

The Epigenetic Variability of Memory

Brain Plasticity and Artistic Creation

Chapter:
3 (p.55) The Epigenetic Variability of Memory
Source:
The Memory Process
Author(s):

Jean-Pierre Changeux

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014571.003.0004

This chapter uses the term “epigenetic” to denote the productive interaction between genetic information and environmental changes—a phenomenon at the core of the brain's plasticity and memory. Memories, the chapter argues, engage strong selection mechanisms following what it refers to as “epigenetic rules”—mental tools that mathematicians and artistic creators have imposed on themselves from the beginning of time, and that have evolved throughout the course of history. In the present context, the term “epigenetic” combines two notions: superimposition upon the action of the genes, chiefly as a result of learning and experience; and coordinated, organized development.

Keywords:   epigenetic, genetic information, environmental changes, brain's plasticity, memory, epigenetic rules, organized development, superimposition

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