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Action, Ethics, and Responsibility$
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Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke, and Harry S. Silverstein

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780262014731

Published to MIT Press Scholarship Online: August 2013

DOI: 10.7551/mitpress/9780262014731.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MIT PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mitpress.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The MIT Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MITSO for personal use.date: 26 February 2021

Making Up One’s Mind

Making Up One’s Mind

Chapter:
(p.67) 4 Making Up One’s Mind
Source:
Action, Ethics, and Responsibility
Author(s):

Randolph Clarke

Publisher:
The MIT Press
DOI:10.7551/mitpress/9780262014731.003.0004

This chapter focuses on the process of deciding or making up one’s mind and the types of deciding. The first type is referred to as practical deciding, in which one comes to have an intention to do a certain thing; the other is cognitive deciding or doxastic deciding, in which one makes up one’s mind based on practical reasoning, and decides how things stand in some matter, thereby coming to have a certain belief. In both types, there is a level of uncertainty in one’s mind, and one seeks a resolution by engaging in the appropriate sort of reasoning. The acquired attitudes in deciding are also significantly similar. Both intention and belief require a level of being committed—in the first type to performing a certain action, in the second to things being a certain way.

Keywords:   process of deciding, practical deciding, cognitive deciding, doxastic deciding, belief, uncertainty, intention

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